world education

Why Direct To Handset Satellite is a Game Changer for World Education

Direct to handset #d2d satellite technology, has the potential to transform world education.

The transformation includes allowing all children to access education.

Currently, millions of children don’t have access to education.

This lack of access disproportionately affects girls and women.

Traditional Mobile (cell) Phones work by having nearby Cell Towers.

These Cell Towers connect the user’s phone to the network, by sending and receiving radio signals between the tower and the handset.

The problem with this traditional approach is that according to satellite operator Lynk Global, only 10% of the world is served by Cell Towers.

Covering the remaining 90% of the earth’s surface, using traditional infrastructure is uneconomic.

This matters, as it’s also uneconomic to install Internet cables underground.

This means that there is still a third of the world, that is not yet connected.

Not being connected to phone calls and the Internet, means that remote communities remain isolated.

It also means that these communities are at a significant disadvantage when it comes educational opportunities.

One of the challenges facing the world is a lack of trained teachers.

This results in students underperforming, in many countries, compared to other more developed ones.

Direct-to-handset connectivity delivers worldwide coverage, of both voice and Internet data.

For more articles on this world education enablement, visit the author’s website.

hytera repeater

Digital Radio Repeater Training

Topics:

Electromagnetic spectrum

Propagation of Radio Waves above 30MHz.

VHF versus UHF

Digital Versus Analogue transmission.

Advantages and disadvantages of digital systems, compared with analogue.

Digital Repeater standards (dPMR, DMR, Tetra etc)

Analogue standards

Trunked Systems

Pseudo Trunk

Antenna systems

Coaxial lines, and considerations

Impedance mismatch implications

Code Plugs and system programming

Designing a reliable communications repeater system.

Power Supplies

Lightning Protection

Regulatory licensing (Ofcom)

Challenge of Installing IOT Sensor Equipment in Explosion Proof Areas

Challenge of Installing IOT Sensor Equipment in Explosion-Proof Areas, by Craig Miles

IoT, or the Internet of Things is already changing the way that businesses function, and this is set to explode in the forthcoming years.

IoT is all about improving business efficiency by collecting information (via sensors) about the physical world (Inputs such as temperature, pressure, location, etc), and then using this data to trigger an automated action, based on the data.

Installing the sensors that provide the ‘inputs’ to your IoT system is usually fairly straightforward in most environments, however potentially explosive environments require special considerations.

When installing any electrical or electronic device in a potentially explosive environment, the device must be rated as ‘EX’ , also known as ‘intrinsically safe’.

Intrinsically safe electrical equipment is available as components such as electric fans, cable glands, and hand-held two-way radios.

This is a business opportunity for IoT device manufacturers to create ‘EX’ rated sensors.

The main thing to consider at all times when designing your install is will my equipment cause a spark, potentially causing an explosion.

First, consider your sensor itself. An example is a sensor located in a ship’s battery room to monitor and report on voltage and a specific gravity of the lead-acid batteries, used for emergency backup.

The sensor you use to collect the information MUST be EX rated / intrinsically safe, to be compliant.

The next consideration is how you are going to get the data from the sensor ‘out’ of the potentially explosive area and to the location where the data is processed.

Wireless technologies such as Zigbee, WIFI, and LORA could be used, but by definition produce RF radiation which could potentially cause an explosion. Therefore it is crucial that only equipment that is EX rated is used.

In the case of environments hostile to RF (Radio Frequency) Radio Waves, such as ships, oil rigs, and other buildings with high metal content, an alternative would be a fixed wired solution.

When using wired methods to transmit sensor data, the cable gland must be designed so that the explosive area remains gas-tight, to prevent explosive gases from interacting with electrical components outside the intrinsically safe area.

Glands for this purpose exist and can be found online.

To conclude, the key to installing the Internet of Things (IOT) in a potentially explosive environment is to ensure that every piece of IoT equipment that is installed is EX rated to prevent explosion risks.

You also need to think about and ensure that any wiring that leaves the intrinsically safe/explosive area goes through properly rated EX glands, to ensure safety.

For more information on the Challenge of Installing IOT Sensor Equipment in Explosion-Proof Areas, why not contact us.

The author is Craig Miles (me) and I can be contacted via www.craigmiles.co.uk

All content is copyright, and copying and all rights are reserved (c) Craig Miles 2015

Internet of Things | Two Way Radio Wireless Communications – Yesway Communications

m2m

M2M (Machine-To-Machine Communications

M2M (Machine-To-Machine) Communications

M2M is short for ‘Machine to Machine’ communications. It works in a similar way to mobile phone communications (Human to Human).

M2M transmits data in real-time between machines automatically, and without human intervention.

Data can be transmitted both wirelessly and by fixed wired methods.

Applications of these technologies include remote monitoring of water levels; smart road signs and remote machinery monitoring.

Wireless technologies are generally the preferred method of transmitting machine data, due to the flexibility of equipment location. Wireless technologies include low powered terrestrial radio transmitters, satellites, and the mobile phone networks.

(c) Craig Miles 2014