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Yesway Updated Privacy Policy Email / Letter

Dear Customer, or previous enquiree,

Your trust is important to us. To help explain the choices and control you have when it comes to your data, Yesway Ltd (t/a: Yesway Communications) is announcing some changes to our Privacy Policy.

These changes will affect users and customers of our business from 25 May 2018 onwards.

Want to read the full policy? Check it out here.

Looking for a quick summary of the updates? Read on:

Transparency: We’ve provided additional detail about the information we collect and how we use that information. We’ve also explained how you can exercise your personal data rights.

GDPR: On 25 May 2018, a new European Union (EU) data protection law – the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – takes effect. The GDPR gives individuals in the EU more control over how their data is used and places certain obligations on businesses that process information belonging to those individuals. We’ve updated our Privacy Policy to take into account the new requirements of the GDPR.

By continuing to use our services on or after 25 May 2018, you acknowledge our updated Privacy Policy. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We’re notifying all Yesway customers and previous contacts / subscribers about this important change. You received this email from us because you have previously been in touch with Yesway Ltd (t/a: Yesway communications). Please let us know how you would prefer us to contact you in the future.

Thank you for reading yet another privacy email, and we hope to be of service again soon.

Yours faithfully

Craig Miles for Yesway Communications (Yesway Ltd)

privacy policy email

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Public WIFI – WIFI4EU

wifi4eu

Public Wifi

Public Wifi that can be freely used by members of the public without paying for it, has been around for a few years now.

Places as diverse as fast food restaurants and  pubs have been offering it, to help attract customers.

Some towns and cities have gone one step further, and offered outdoor WIFI to the public, allowing free Internet connection on the go.

The European Commission, which is part of the EU has recently stated its ambition to give free WIFI to EU Citizens, in towns and cities throughout the European Union.

The funding is available between 2017-2019, and is open to all municipalities within  EU member states.

This includes the United Kingdom, as we are not due to leave the EU until March 2019.

Funding provides vouchers on a first come first served basis, that allow local municipalities  to select an registered provider company, to supply and install free public WIFI.

Yesway Ltd is registered with the EU, as an authorised provider company, and can help bring free public WIFI to your local town of city.

To get the ball rolling, contact us on (01522) 740818, and ask for Craig Miles.

Alternatively use the contact form on this site below

[contact-form-7 id=”3453″ title=”Contact form 1″]

Links:

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/policies/wifi4eu-free-wi-fi-europeans

wifi4eu

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Industrial digital two-way radio light Industrial & Retail Use – Yesway communications

schools radio

Hytera PD405 UHF DMR Digital Radio

Industrial Radio for light factory operations or Retail Environments.

When choosing a hand-held two way radio for your factory, there are various factors to consider.

If you operate a light manufacturing factory, such as a printing works, then the atmosphere will be fairly clean.

For such situations, a radio such as the Hytera PD405 is ideal.

Industrial Conventional digital two-way radio

Robust and reliable, the Hytera PD405 handheld digital radio offers a simple communication solution, ideal for users operating in manufacturing, facilities management or education environments.

VHF & UHF Models

Available

Digital DMR

Clear Audio

For more details visit our website: www.yesway.co.uk

Legacy compatible

Can communicate with existing older analogue radios

long term charge

The Hytera PD405 has long battery life

Clear Audio

DMR Digital technology ensures clear voice quality.

If you are likely to be operating in more harsh factory environments, then we would recommend you let us advise you on the best options available.

Typically for harsh environments such as wet conditions, you will want a radio with a high IP or Ingress Protection rating.

One such radio, which we would recommend is the Entel DN400, which is an IP68 rated handheld radio.

What this means is that the radio can be dropped into water and survive*

* Up to 2M deep for 30 minutes.

Another consideration, is are you likely to be operating in environments where there is a potentially explosive atmosphere.

An example of such a location is the battery room of a ship, where potentially flammable gases are realeased while the ships batteries are being recharged.

Environments where there is a potential risk of explosion, require intrinsically safe (ATEX) rated radios.

Intrinsically safe radios have specially sealed cases and components, that prevent an electrical spark being created by the radio.

For expert advice, contact us on 01522 740818

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6lowpan

what is lora

Have a question?

01522 740818

6Lowpan

What is 6lowpan?

The name 6LoWPAN comes from an acronym consisting of a combination of the  IPv6 Internet Protocol and also Low-power Wireless Personal Area Networks (LoWPAN). 

6lowpan is designed to allow the Internet Protocol to be wirelessly transmitted on small devices , which only have limited processing power.

Wireless IOT

Standard

Low Power Devices

Compatible


Contact Us

For more details visit our website: www.yesway.co.uk

Low Power Devices

Suspen disse males uada feugiat felis vel dignissim. Proin porta ultricies eros et iaculis

IIOT

Suitable for Low Power Industrial Internet Of Things Devices

long term battery life

Suitable for low power devices, that are optimised for low power consumption.

Integration

We can custom integrate 6Lowpan technology into existing or new products

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MQTT

Photo of internet of things network

MQTT  in IOT?

MQTT is short for MQ Telemetry Transport, and is a messaging protocol used in the Internet Of Things (IOT) systems.

It is  very simple and lightweight messaging protocol, designed for devices with limited processing power and low-bandwidth, high-latency or unreliable networks.

MQTT was designed  to minimise network bandwidth and device resource requirements, whilst also attempting to ensure  data delivery reliability and some degree of assurance of delivery.

The MQTT protocol ideal for Internet of things (IOT)  “machine-to-machine” (M2M) devices.

This is because  bandwidth and battery power are at a premium, in IOT equipment designs.

We can incorporate MQTT into custom equipment for our clients.

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What Is Industry 4.0 & Smart Factories

industry 4.0

Industry 4.0

Industry 4.0 is a phrase that you will increasing hear in business manufacturing, but what exactly is it?

According to Wikipedia it is the following:-

“Industry 4.0 is the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things and cloud computing. Industry 4.0 creates what has been called a “smart factory”. (Source: Wikipedia.com)

Why 4.0?

Industry 4.0 is often described as the Forth Industrial Revolution, so it would be useful to explain what Industry 1,2 & 3 were.

Industry 1.0

Industry 1.0 refers to the first industrial revolution that started around 1780.

The first industrial revolution was powered by water and steam, and was very mechanical in nature.

Industry 2.0

In 1870 the first electrically powered assembly line was introduced, and as the distribution of electricity become widespread, it opened up further opportunities for manufacturing.

This was the start of the era of mass production.

Industry 3.0

From the late 1960s onwards , computerisation started to be introduced into industrial processes.

This started with the Modicon 084 , which was the first PLC, which is short for Programmable Logic Controller.

A PLC is basically an industrial computer, used to control production processes.

By using PLC control, factories were able to improve efficiency, and save time and money.

An example of how a PLC did (and still does) save money is  that the program software can be easily changed and modified, to adapt to manufacturing requirements.

Prior to PLC control, you would need to redesign, and rewire large parts of your factory plant, to carry out the new process.  This was both time consuming , and expensive to do.

Industry 4.0

The latest revolution in manufacturing involves  minimal intervention & involvement by human beings.

Instead what is often described as ‘machine learning’ takes place, where algorithms make decisions based on live input data.

 

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What is Lora

what is lora

Lora

LoRa is a spread spectrum wireless technology, developed by Semtech Corporation. It has been developed to allow long distance transmission of low rate data. The low rate data is collected by remote field sensors and actuators, and is used for Internet of Things and M2M applications. Lora uses the 868 Mhz unlicensed radio spectrum, in what is known as the ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Medical) bands to wirelessly facilitate low power, wide area data communication between the remote sensors and gateway devices, which connect to the Internet, or other network.

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How to Build a Lorawan Gateway

industry 4.0

What is  Lorawan

First of all, what is Lorawan.  It is a wireless technology that allows small amounts of data to be sent between a remote sensor (such as a river level detector), and the Internet.

Lorawan technology is very efficient at sending the sensor data over long distances, whilst consuming very little power. This means that a the sensor devices can be battery powered, whilst the batteries last for years.

What is a Gateway then

A Lorawan Gateway is the device that receives the wireless signals containing data, that has been transmitted (using Lora wireless technology) from the remote sensors (river level monitoring, air quality etc).

Once the  Gateway has received the  wirelessly transmitted data, the gateway forwards the data onto the Internet.

Gateway connection to the Internet can be via a variety of means, such as Wifi, Ethernet, 3G, 4G, 5G etc.

Building the Gateway

For beginners to building their own gateway, I would recommend joining, or founding a local Things Network .

The Lorawan Gateway that I am going to describe here, is designed to operate on the Things Network, however other lora networks can easily be installed.

The main components that you will need are:-

1) A Concentrator board from IMST of Germany. The Concentrator board is the wireless communications part of the system, responsible for receiving the wireless data signals, from the remote environmental sensors (Air quality sensors etc).

2) A small computer to store the software that controls the Concentrator board. We are going to use the UK designed Raspberry PI 3.

A Micro SD Card, for holding the software used by the Raspberry PI.  A small 4 GB card is fine.

3) A suitable Antenna (or Aerial), with pigtail connecting cable.

4) A suitable 2 Amp rated power supply, with a micro USB connector.

5)  7 Female to Female connecting leads, suitable for raspberry PI.

4) A suitable case, to house the components.

 

The first thing I need to make you aware of is the risk of static electricity, to your IMST ic880a Concentrator and Raspberry PI.

Static can damage the sensitive electronic components, therefore it is advisable to take precautions, such as not touching the board components, and wearing an anti static wrist strap.

The first thing you need to do is to format the micro SD card, that will be fitted to the raspberry PI, to hold the gateway software.

The SD card association has a free piece of software, for Windows PC and Mac, to do this. My card was already formatted, so I skipped this step.

The next step is to burn the actual software that will power your gateway, onto the Raspberry PI.

To do this, I used https://etcher.io/    

I first installed Etcher onto my  linux desktop computer. As most people use Windows PC, or Mac, you will need to find a suitable alternative to Etcher.

I also downloaded the operating system needed to run the Raspberry Pi, which is called Raspbian Stretch Lite , onto my desktop PC.

Put your micro SD card into your computers micro SD card reader. If your computer (like mine) does not have a card reader, then external USB plug in ones can be purchased cheaply (I got mine from my local Asda supermarket for £6).

Fire up Etcher, or whatever card  burning software you prefer, and select the copy of Raspbian Stretch Lite , that you previously downloaded to your PC.

Follow the instructions, and burn the operating system software onto the micro SD card.

Once you have successfully burned your Raspbian Stretch Lite, onto your SD card, insert it into the Raspberry Pi (the slot is on the underside of the Pi).

The next thing to do is to connect your Raspberry Pi to a suitable monitor (I used a TV, that had a HDMI connection), and also connect a USB keyboard, power supply, and mouse.

The power supply should be 5 Volts DC, and Raspberry Pi power supplies are widely available. I used a USB phone charger, with 5 Volts output, and a current rating of 2000mA.

Boot up your Raspberry Pi (connect the power), and you will see lots of computer code scrolling across your screen (if you have done everything successfully, so far).

When the Raspberry Pi asks you for a user name and password, use the following default ones (the  bit after the  ‘ : ‘ ).

Username: Pi

Password: Raspberry

After you have successfully logged in, type:

 sudo raspi-config

Numbered options will now hopefully be on your monitor screen.

Select [5] Interfacing Options, and then P4 SPI

Then select [7] Advanced Options , and then [A1] Expand Filesystem.

You now need to exit the raspi-config utility, either by hitting the ‘CTRL’  and  ‘X’ keys, or by typing sudo reboot

Next you are going to Configure the locales and time zone.

Type this in, to set the locales, and follow instruction.

sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales

Next, type this in to set time zone.

sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata

The next stage is to update the raspberry Pi software, do this by typing:

sudo apt-get update

Then install any upgrades to the operating system software, by typing sudo apt-get upgrade

Next we are going to install Git , which is needed to be able to download the Things Network software from Github.

Type:

sudo apt-get install git

The next step is to create a user called TTN (the things network).  This user will eventually replace the default raspberry pi user, which we will delete.

sudo adduser ttn

Then:    sudo adduser ttn sudo

Logout, by typing logout

Once you have logged out, log back in using the user name and password that you have just set up, when you added a user.

You can now delete the default Raspberry Pi user, by typing

sudo userdel -rf pi

 

Set the WIFI  SSID and password details, which can be found on the back of your home router / Hub (usually).

To set the WIFI details type

sudo nano /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf 

Once you have typed in the above text, you should see some code on the screen. Add the following to the end of the existing code, making sure that you enter your SSID and password details, in place of the shown text.

network=

{
ssid="The_SSID_of_your_wifi"
psk="Your_wifi_password"

}

Now we are going to clone the installer from Github. This will download the software which runs the gateway, from the Github repository.  Type each of the following three code lines into your Pi, one at a time, hitting the return key after each line of code.

  git clone -b spi https://github.com/ttn-zh/ic880a-gateway.git ~/ic880a-gateway
  cd ~/ic880a-gateway
  sudo ./install.sh spi

Identifying the Gateway

The software will give the gateway the default name of ttn-gateway.

This however may need to be changed, to prevent issues with other Things Network Gateways within wireless range.

Wiring it Up

The next step is to connect the Concentrator board, to the Raspberry Pi, and also connect the antenna.

The components including the antenna should be mounted in a protective box,  and the antenna connected to the Concentrator board.

It is very important that the Concentrator board is not powered up, with no suitable antenna connected, of damage could occur to the board.

Once the antenna is connected, then the next step is to connect the Concentrator to the Raspberry Pi.

Connect using female to female connecting wires, as follows:

iC880a Concentrator pin Description RPi physical pin
21 Supply 5V 2
22 GND 6
13 Reset 22
14 SPI CLK 23
15 MISO 21
16 MOSI 19
17 NSS 24

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:

It is important that you identify the correct pins, by referring to the manufactures data sheets (Both IMST & Raspberry Pi).

We accept no liability for loss or damage caused, by following these information only instructions.

For help, as to which pin is which on the Concentrator and Raspberry Pi boards, why not get in touch.

I also offer workshop training, where I can train your students to build their own Lorawan Gateways.

@acraigmiles

www.craigmiles.co.uk

Craig Miles (C) 2018 , all images and content, unless stated separately.

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Fuses in Radio Equipment power Supplies

taxi radio faults

The importance of fuses in radio equipment power supplies

A safe two-way radio equipment installation requires the ability to quickly disconnect the supply to the equipment, if a fault develops. Fuses are a cost effective solution, for equipment safety.

What are Electrical Fuses

Fuses are devices that protect equipment installations, from excess electrical current.

Excess current is caused by a fault in the equipment, or system wiring, and can cause equipment damage, or even fire.

The fuse works by ‘blowing’ if a certain current through it is exceeded. When the fuse ‘blows’, the electrical current ceases to flow, due to a physical break inside the fuse, preventing current flow through it.

Types of Fuses

Electrical fuses come in a variety of package types, and current ratings.

For example, package types include ‘cartridge’ and ‘blade’ designs.

Fuses are also made to blow at different current thresholds, so can be matched to the piece of equipment it is connected to.

There are also fuse types known as ‘slow blow’ fuses.

Slow Blow fuses are designed not to blow due to a short spike in electrical current. Short spikes can be caused by surge currents, which is a very temporary increase in current, when a piece of equipment is started.

Importance of correct Fuses

Fitting an incorrect fuse can either reduce safety, or reliability.

For example, if a fuse is fitted that has too high a current blow rating, then if a fault develops with the equipment, the electricity will find another weak point in the system. This weak point could be the radio equipment itself, and the excess current could damage it.

On the other hand, fitting a fuse that has too small a current rating will reduce system reliability.

This is because the current being drawn by the radio equipment is more than the fuse can cope with, and therefore will blow.

Two way radio equipment, draws less current when receiving, than when it is transmitting. Therefore the fitting of a too small fuse, may not become apparent, until the two way radio transmits.

Always refer to the manufacturers equipment specifications to understand the maximum current that the equipment will draw, and select a fuse slightly larger.

If no manufacturers data is available, then using an Ammeter in series with the DC supply, can determine the current drawn. Remember however, to also test on transmit, and with maximum transmit power selected (if an option).

(c) 2018 Craig Miles / Yesway Ltd.